Author Archives: M1KRONAUT

Paride Saraceni – Memento EP

Paride Saraceni - Memento EP

UK-based producer Paride Saraceni returns to Dema’s Redrum label with a new two tracker firmly rooted in his house-influenced techno style, while¬†diverging in two entirely different directions.

The first tune and title track, “Memento,” is built on a thick and bouncing groove, using a vocal hook and short, powerful stabs as it builds. Part way through the track introduces an interlude of a synth pattern, which is a bit reminiscent of guitar harmonics and leads into the main break. This track is pure dancefloor energy, and while it retains a recognizable Saraceni sound, its beauty is in the unique and immediately notable rhythm.

Track 2, “Never Feels Right,” is a bit reminiscent of the artist’s previous releases for Truesoul, and as such it had some early support from Adam Beyer on his Drumcode Live radioshow. The groove and percussion in this one is far more subtle, and the tune is mostly driven by the resonant, thick and flowing pads, backed by a vocal singing the title phrase in a wistful voice.

Paride Saraceni’s “Memento EP” will be released on April 17th on Redrum Music.

Follow Paride Saraceni: SoundCloud / Facebook
Follow Redrum Music: SoundCloud / Facebook

Layton Giordani – Where It Begins

It’s not often that an artist makes a non-compilation debut on Drumcode with a full album. In fact, it has never happened before in the history of the label. But that’s exactly what young Amsterdam-based producer Layton Giordani is doing at the end of February, following up his tune “Rivington” which was part of the last A-Sides compilation. The album consists of 12 massive tracks, showcasing the artist’s signature euphoric style and massive big-room percussion, as well as demonstrating the his highly intricate and varied craftsmanship.

The album begins with the intro “Escalate,” a tune which starts the night off perfectly, its swelling energy setting the tone for an unforgettable party. It begins with a simple, yet distinctive repeated synth tone. This tone is eventually layered with a pad that swells to the max, before finally dropping off to make way for a subtle bassline and crowd sample.

Next up, the title track “Where It Begins” is everything we’ve come to expect from Giordani, using dark, heavy-hitting percussion in a distinctive pattern. A two-note pad hook is introduced during the break, which builds along with a rhythmic snare roll before finally continuing into the drop.

“Turn It Around” might possibly be the perfect festival tune. It starts off at nothing but a filtered hat, growing slowly and cautiously, then floats on to the break, leaving only a single high-pitched note. The artist demonstrates his impeccable crowd control with this one, using very specific builds and releases before finally introducing the main theme of the track, a chorus of energetic, stabbing chords.

“Supernova” is a bit of a break, dropping energy levels slightly and calling back to tracks like his Octopus tune “People And Things” by using a single synth pattern that is automated throughout. However, it also takes things in a new direction for the producer, as the beat is a bit softer and less driving, allowing the listener to focus more on the dynamics of the alien arpeggio.

“Fire Eyes” has been hyped for months now, and listeners should easily be able to tell why. It might be considered a counterpart to the previously-released “Rivington,” as the structure and percussion is similar in each, though this track is soft and emotional where “Rivington” is hard and sharp. The break is a wonderfully-crafted melodic gem, using a mixture of deep pads and leads to hypnotize the listener completely.

“Silver Shadows” could be the darkest track on the album, built on a percussive stab with minimal melody and lined with a cyclone of hats. The vocal is instantly memorable, and its repetitive, garbled tone is well-suited for the atmosphere of the track. While the tune still features the pads that the artist loves so much, their use is very subtle and discreet, mostly floating through the background rather than driving the groove.

Next, “Sometimes” is another club killer, though far more menacing than tracks like “Fire Eyes” or “Turn It Around.” The beat marches irresistibly forward, backed by a metallic hit and a dark vocal sample which is forcibly cut. The bass progression that’s introduced during the break is capable of casting sonic shadows on a festival crowd, and something about it feels far more ominous than most of the other selections on the album.

Taking things slightly softer, “Euphoria” has that instantly-recognizable Giordani sound, though the track might be better suited for warming things up than blowing off a club roof at peak-time. The mid-section is based on a pseudo-break-beat, with a pulsating synth layered over the top, practically begging the listener to get up and dance.

“Dragon Fly” is an entirely different beast. It is simultaneously harsher and funkier than the average (if there is such a thing) Giordani production. The soulful, melancholic hook, contrasted with the-well rounded bass stab, makes the track perfect for listening at home, while the cold and hard baseline also keeps it dancefloor friendly.

“Tigerlilly” is very well placed on the album, bringing energy levels back up to take things full circle. Its vibes take it in yet another new direction, but it is clearly built for clubs and festivals. A pulsing, delayed lead and powerful vocal coupled with driving hats almost blur the lines between techno and trance, but the thumping kick and percussive flourishes keep it firmly rooted.

“Good Violence” was one of the first tracks to be produced, played by Layton Giordani as early as the beginning of 2015. While there was a bit of a wait, its eventual release was inevitable. This track is a true anthem, born to be a closer. Euphoric, symphonic pads sing an unforgettable melody that conveys the feelings of unity and soul that are so important in techno culture, aided by a crisp kick and snare.

Finally, closing this masterpiece of an album is “Where It Begins (Outro).” Though one might infer from the title that this is an alternate mix of the album’s title track, this one is completely different, using dark percussion and pads with a softer edge for an electronica vibe, unlike anything the producer has released in the past.

“Where It Begins” will be released on Drumcode on February 27th. Samples (except for “Good Violence”) are not available yet, but we’ll keep you posted.

Follow Layton Giordani: SoundCloud / Facebook
Follow Drumcode: SoundCloud / Facebook

Stephan Hinz – Off Numbers

Stephan Hinz returns to Intec after his 2015 collaboration with Philipp Ruhmhardt, called “Magnet.” This time the German synth mastermind has provided us with two dark, club-ready tunes that bring Carl Cox’s legendary label into 2017 properly.

The title track uses a percussion-based bassline for a distinctive, off-kilter groove, while fluffy, driving hi hats keep things moving. A deep, crisp bass hook provides a contrast to the bright bell-like synth, building the tune in proper Hinz style, with a massive crescendo that burns away before the drop.

On the flip side, “Shaded” calls back to some of the artist’s earlier tunes, using a beat which is a bit reminiscent of his track “Breakout” on Adam Beyer’s Drumcode label. This track, however, is a bit softer, with a dissonant hook layered against a metallic pad. The constant automation and variation keeps the track fresh and proves that the producer knows exactly how to produce a dancefloor weapon.

“Off Numbers” is out now on Intec.

Follow Stephan Hinz: SoundCloud / Facebook
Follow Intec: SoundCloud / Facebook

Timmo – System

Timmo - System

Timmo returns to the grand Swedish label Drumcode for his second solo EP, following up 2014’s “We Beat On,” which included the unforgettable “Canvas.” The new release, “System,” is easily a worthy successor, featuring four massive tunes without a single dull moment.

The opener, “Intensify,” has been a mainstay in Adam Beyer’s sets for months, and proves that you don’t need harsh drums and booming bass to create a dancefloor weapon. This track is driven mostly by the percussion, which shifts constantly, from low rides to shakers to light claves. Running throughout, following and complementing the beat is a low growling bass hook that is unmistakable and heralds the beginning of the greatest party the world has ever seen.

“The Maze” is next, with heavier vibes built to move a crowd. The lead is fashioned from a chord pattern, using a sound that merges the bionic and the organic, automated in psychedelic waves. Meanwhile, in Timmo’s signature fashion, a glowing pad gives the track another dimension of life, making it clear that this masterpiece will be remembered for ages to come.

The title track keeps things going strong, laying down a steady, thumping kick and a dark bassline tuned for maximum power. The hats roll effortlessly over the beat, ushering in the chaotic, torrential lead. The result is a dangerously energetic tune that conveys imagery of peak time at an underground rave, or possibly a global-scale war against robots.

Closing the package is “Together,” its bold low-ends shape the groove into something a bit deeper. This effect is magnified through the use of a percussive hook and fluffy hats, setting the track apart from the other three. The retro-style vocals complete the emotion, giving off vibes that may be slightly melancholic, but also hopeful.

“System” will be released on Drumcode on January 23rd.

Follow Timmo: SoundCloud / Facebook
Follow Drumcode: SoundCloud / Facebook

Gary Beck – Stupid Advert EP

Gary Beck - Stupid Advert EP

Gary Beck is back on his label BEK Audio with his new “Stupid Advert” EP. This time around the Glasgow-based producer has provided three tunes that are a bit different than any of his previous releases, but still feature his signature cycle of steady builds and releases.

The title track features a solid, steady bass line, which is accented with rolled snares and soft rides that form the backbone of the groove. A hypnotic hook folds in and out of the mix, along with periodic filtered stabs that create a sinister air.

Next up, “Concraza” uses a groaning synth pattern in the bass range, eventually bringing in flowing hats and a breathy pad. A broken vocal works wonders in giving the tune an extra bit of originality. Of all the tracks on the EP, this one probably calls back the most to previous Beck tunes stylistically.

Finally, “ST11” is pure darkness. The groove is minimalistic, with a crunchy percussion rhythm that is offset from the rest of the beat and soft, resonant stabs. Eventually a shimmering background becomes more prominent as the tune is lead into the main break. This track definitely knows where it is going, keeping a definite gloom and warehouse vibes throughout.

Gary Beck’s “Stupid Advert EP” is out now on BEK Audio. You can check out the full previews over at Juno Download.

Follow Gary Beck: SoundCloud / Facebook
Follow BEK Audio: SoundCloud / Facebook

Kaiserdisco – Toleranz EP

Kaiserdisco - Toleranz

At this point German duo Kaiserdisco are just as much Drumcode regulars as artists like Alan Fitzpatrick and Bart Skils. They are making their return to the imprint with their sixth solo EP, which is rather different in style from what they’ve previously released on the label. With “Toleranz EP” the duo showcases their dark, gritty techno side, and only small traces of the house influences that are clear in their previous EPs can be seen here.

“Get Enough” starts things off dark, but still has a clear connection to the melody for which Drumcode releases are known. The track crescendos massively early on, and uses small dips, builds, and atmospherics to ensure high energy levels throughout the entire track.

The second tune, “Toleranz,” is almost a variation on the theme of the previous track, with a similar pulsing bassline and rolling hats, but it takes the sound in a completely different direction. This tune is much darker, with harsh, screeching atmospherics and menacing vocals, chugging along like an industrial-grade combustion engine.

Next, “Cobra” is a call-back to the styles of the duo’s previous Drumcode releases. This one is faster, with an intricate and groovy bassline that melts nicely into the shakers, hats, and rides to give the tune a relentless feel. The artists utilize syncopated, bubbly stabs as the main hook to make this one highly danceable.

Finally, closing things off is a remix of the previous EP’s “SQ 80” by emotional techno masters Pleasurekraft. Their interpretation is wildly different from the original, only recognizable by the vocals. They’ve given the track their own touch, with an odd rhythm and organic arpeggio. However, the deep pads and layering on the main hook are what truly make the track, transforming it into nothing short of an anthem.

Kaiserdisco’s “Toleranz EP” will be released tomorrow on Drumcode.

Durtysoxxx – Deja Vu

Durtysoxxx - Deja Vu

US-based Funk’n Deep Records, headed up by Durtysoxxx, has been one of the fastest-growing brands in the techno scene, particularly in the past year, with huge releases coming from artists like D-Unity, The Reactivitz, Spartaque, Skober, and more. The support they’ve been getting is well deserved, and we are proud to be reviewing this release from the main man himself.

The original mix is dark, driving, and straightforward, using classic vocals to add that extra emotional touch. The producer uses a few short breaks to provide an extra bit of tension that release with a bomb-shell blast as the track drops, an effect that’s a bit reminiscent of some of Raffaele Rizzi’s recent productions. The elements of darkness and groove are balanced to perfection, resulting in a tune that won’t be forgotten quickly.

Up next is a remix from Peter Bailey, which is our favorite track from the single. This mix is a bit more tech-influced, but still carries the vocal and the darkness from the original. For his mix, Peter has chosen a unique percussion line and pad combo that give the track a memorable, distinctive feel. As the break approaches, a deep and majestic melody rolls in like a siren call.

Sonate closes the release with his own interpretation of the track, and this version is by far the heaviest of the three. He makes use of the reverb from the original vocal for an ambient effect, and introduces a stab that becomes a hook at the end of the break.

“Deja Vu” is out now on Funk’n Deep Records.